Umpiring "Quiz"

Discussion in 'Resources, Equipment, Signals' started by Cascadia, Mar 2, 2007.

  1. redumpire

    redumpire FHF All Time Great
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    It was tough Keely: honestly.

    When the pink shirts were introduced to England quite a few of the old timers in my county association said that they would not wear it because it was "a woman's colour"! One bloke even said his wife would not let him wear pink! (In my experience Justin, it was far more likely to be the boring old farts rather than the macho men who objected.)

    Anyway, let's get back on topic...
     
  2. aussieump

    aussieump FHF All Time Great
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    Cascadia In addition to the quiz it maybe possible for the local association or a local sponsor could supply some items of use for the umpires that attended. Eg Whistles, Cards, Rule Book, Caps etc.

    Local Car delaers quite often have hats/caps they use for sponsorship. Your supplier of equipment may provide some whistles for the promotion, Other rewards such a vouchers etc to encourage attendance.

    Maybe the local Association could provide some of these items as part of their development committment?

    Aussieump
     
  3. Gilly

    Gilly FHF Legend

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    I have no problem with Pink - as Keely will no doubt attest, as it goes perfectly with my eyes after a night entertaining (in the purely platonic sense) a lady Canadian umpire who has a penchant for the vin rouge and no game the next day!
     
  4. Cascadia

    Cascadia FHF Legend

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    Field hockey is really not a big sport around here, comparatively speaking, so it would be pretty hard to find sponsorship for things like that. In addition, at the moment we are trying to funnel all possible monetary donations into our fields fund so we can get some proper astro-turf instead of the four (sloping, crappy, soggy) grass fields we have right now. At the moment, we provide umpire shirts and fox40 whistles (with club logo on them - oh, so special) with lanyards for a total of CAN$10, which is pretty damn good, I would say.

    The clinic I am conducting is for modified half-field U10 rules, so cards aren't necessary, but we do have to look into getting cards for the other clinics. I'm not technically on the umpiring committee anymore (because it is SO stressful), but I will suggest it and see if we can throw cards in at least for next year. (Man, we are so ghetto)

    I will see what I can get for cheap that could be useful for umpiring and see if I can give some of it away as bingo prizes (although the candy usually does the trick). I don't know what the budget looks like this year (again, no longer on the committee), but last year the club purchased quite a bit of goalie gear, so I'm not sure what umpiring has to deal with. You have to remember, though, that these kids ARE getting paid to umpire already, which eats out of the budget, so I don't want to throw too much free stuff at them: the rate just went up to CAN$15/game, from $10/game last year. Hell, that's probably more than I make /hour at work!

    The main problem with getting kids out to the clinic, I think, is lack of role models. Most of the people they see umpiring are adult men, or "old ladies" (or, as I so tactfully said on my first day on the executive 2 years ago, "When kids think of umpires they think of old fogies in visors!"...thankfully, everyone had had a few drinks at the time and didn't take it to heart), so they don't see umpiring as something young people do or can become good at. It's getting better, but it's hard to get them to want to advance, rather than just stick at U14 games. :(
     
  5. justin-old

    justin-old FHF Legend

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    All right then, "macho old farts"..... we certainly had 'em in the BOHUA and HBHUA areas.... I(and my wife) think that, with the black trim, it's rather fetching :)
    As you say, back on topic.... as a kid, my umpiring 'role model' was my father.... although I had aspirations to be better than he was ;)
    We had our 'rules quizzes' at home!
     
  6. keely

    keely FHF Legend

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    I know exactly what you mean - I remember the staid old crew that I joined when I was persuaded to turn in my stick for a whistle (on the national level) back in 2000. However, a lot of things and people have changed.

    Role models? You're one of them, Cas. Look at Megan, Gillian, Denise (ok, she has a masters in library sciences but she's awfully hip regardless)... oh heck, ME, Wendy, Audra, Amy Nilsson (all in Calgary)... on the men's side, John Hrytsak can turn any skeptic into a full-time umpire with his enthusiasm and stories...

    I believe strongly that half the problem is that we're apologetic about being umpires. We apologize for asking favours to get others invovled. We tolerate wearing crappy shirts that make us look 20 pounds heavier than we are. We don't have our own "team swag". No wonder kids look at players and think - that's where the glamour's at! I want to be a player!

    Start with yourself. Take pride in your appearance. There are few players at higher levels that don't consciously wear their hair in more flattering ways, fuss with how their uniform looks by tucking something in or rolling their skirts to make them shorter, pick out the sweet kicks... why the hell aren't we doing that? I've pretty much trademarked the Eternal Quest For the Perfect Umpiring Skirt and encouraged others to join me in the journey.

    Vain? Hell yes. But whether you're a player, coach, umpire, official, executive, princess, etc. etc. you find confidence in how you look. People appreciate that you take pride in what you do, and hold your role in higher esteem.

    On the substance side of things, look at it this way. A lot of people can play this game decently, but far fewer can umpire to the same standard. It's even more rare to be an excellent umpire. If you want to be special and part of a select and somewhat mysterious elite, umpiring is it!

    You may say, well, I see the "old fogies" and lower-level umps out there and they sure aren't all that special - you're right, they're not. Those that go out, week after week, never thinking about how to improve themeselves, never training, never sharing their knowledge with the community, never interacting with players, coaches and officials ... In other words, to me, they're not umpires. They're people that umpire. Big difference.

    Be proud. Show your pride. The kids will come along.
     
  7. David_Underdown

    David_Underdown FHF Regular Player

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  8. Cascadia

    Cascadia FHF Legend

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    Yes yes YES. I have an awful, awful picture of me from BC Summer Games in which the teams playing were red and yellow (the two official umpiring colours - we ruled out black because, well, it was Kamloops and it was 38 degrees), and I ended up wearing Gill's size large, very orange, USFH umpiring shirt. I'm not stick by any means, but it is nonetheless ridiculous how huge I look in that shirt. Thankfully, I have what I believe are the only two prints of that photo, and don't plan to share them any time soon!

    Gill mentioned something about getting on FHBC's case about providing different uniform tops for women and men, so the women don't look so dumpy all the time. That would certainly be nice! As for skirts, Megan's is probably as close as I've seen one that is both functional and not-too-hard on the eyes. I am just glad I'm not stuck in a 20 year old, hand-me-down, faded, pleated kilt anymore. Oh, the unspeakable horror...

    Haven't met Denise, but anyone that's into books is OK in my mind (exactly how much of a geek that makes me, I'm not sure). But I definitely agree on Megan and Gill. Having people close to my own age, and who are umpiring at a higher level (and who are both absolutely hilarious in their own ways) is the best thing that ever happened to my development as an umpire. It's like having someone say "Look, you can achieve that" which is much less of a stretch than when your role models are old enough to be your mother (or grandmother in some cases. O_O). Hopefully in a couple of years we'll be able to turn the stereotype around and who knows, maybe we'll even have an umpire surplus! (har-har-har!)

    As Mike Mahood once said, "Look good, feel good, play good." While not necessarily grammatically correct, it can easily be translated into umpiring terms - and definitely not something to dismiss when considering the development of umpires. :)

    I don't mind, the discussion's all relevant to the final cause. :yes:
     
  9. Cascadia

    Cascadia FHF Legend

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    OK, so I have drafted up a rough "lesson plan" for the course I am doing, and wouldn't mind some feedback:

    Also, still need more actual questions for the "quiz" - omigosh, have we finally gone back to the original question?!

    Anyone? Anyone? Bueller?
     
  10. aussieump

    aussieump FHF All Time Great
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    Third team on the field

    Only signal your calls and learn to signal on demand as NCU. This will assist them long term. Also helps sell the call of both umpires.

    Break groups into small group of say 3 - 4 and let them provide a scenario / question they answer to you then present this to the other groups and see what answer they give. After all groups have answered, the original group will provide their answer and reason for the decision.

    Designate a type of question for each group. This ensures a range of questions are being asked.


    Hope this helps
     
  11. keely

    keely FHF Legend

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    The best place to go without reinventing the wheel would be a certification exam. You'll then be able to modify the questions to make them a little more interesting and fun. I've got a couple of digital ones (copy & paste, anyone?) kicking around if you'd like me to email them to you, just PM me your email and I'll send em off.
     
  12. Diligent

    Diligent FHF All Time Great
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    Hi Cascadia,

    This is an important topic you have raised, and I wonder if your students would find it more lively and "sticky" if you shuffled your lesson plan a bit.

    You might let the "How are your games umpired?" lead into listing how they would know a great umpire from a terrible umpire. You should get something like:
    - Great: gets decisions right, lets the players play, good advantage, open - it's clear what they decided and why, consistent with colleague and with other games in series/league. - Terrible: misses offences, guesses (wrong) what happened, keeps stopping play, defensive about decisions, doesn't know rules, erratic and odd decisions, fails to punish cynical malicious or physical misconduct.

    "And which sort of umpire are we going to be?" leads, of course, to the core skill; The Umpire's Decision.
    This is what it's about, and everything else merely improves the chance of getting The Decision right.
    Something happens.
    Was a rule broken? No = play on; Yes = go to rule 12.1 Advantage (most used rule in the book)
    Disadvantage? No = play on; Yes = whistle and award penalty.
    Suggest that, at first, newbie umps should penalise every offence they see; the players must see them making decisions and not missing them, and they'll soon develop their judgement of advantage.

    Now is the time to have fun with whistles, and then calm them all down with some factual stuff about the field of play so they are ready for the next most important thought - Positioning. If the umpire is to make correct decisions, they must be where they will see what truly happened, or support where their partner can count on their help. Now you've got them all enthusiastic about 'why' they are umpiring and 'how', they should lap up the 'what' of Fouls and Signals, and running the set pieces - FH, PC, PS.

    By the time you've done that, half the class will have stopped learning, but they can always go back to the handout for the stuff that comes in this tail-end of the session; the finer points of pre-game chat, equipment, spectators, support system, etc. Finish off with your quiz and Umpire BINGO! and I'm sure you'll have a fresh crop of umpires raring to go at some real hockey.


    Oh yeah, the topic! Maybe not quiz your newbie umps on the borderline judgements that we discuss in this Forum. Better to build confidence with obvious yes/no, or where knowing the right answer will save embarassment: Do you stop time for PC? ..PS? FHD taken other side of circle from offence - OK? '15m' hit taken 1m from backline - OK? Who whistles restart after goal - ump who gave it, or ump timing the half? etc.

    Apologies to all for the over-long post, but I hope it makes sense.
     
  13. Cascadia

    Cascadia FHF Legend

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    Thanks for reminding me of those things, aussieump (I should've been more clear on what I meant by signalling every call - but better to find out my ambiguities here than to unwittingly pass them on to new umps!). I also like the group idea - it might help for them to interact with others not only to break the monotony, but also to get them to see what others are thinking.

    I like this. It helps them break that "all umpires "senior" to me are perfect" mindset (which I am only just getting over myself) but if they identify good traits as being 'terrible" then it gives an opportunity for discussion of why the umpire may be doing that etc. etc. I will probably take a look at some past quizzes if I can find them online (or from keely or aussieump) - I'll have to adjust some of the questions (or leave some out) because the level I am teaching for will be umpiring half-field 7-aside with no goalies and rectangular 'shooting areas" instead of circles, but the basic principles remain the same.

    Thank you to everyone for your help (and any more is appreciated too!) - I really think this course is going to rock (and definitely be more fun than the other two being hosted!) My main goal is to get them excited about/thinking about/TALKING about umpiring, rather than just sitting there and having the rules read at them (which, I fear, is what's going to happen at our introductory full-field rules clinic...ugh.)
     
  14. g9

    g9 FHF Legend

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    It sounds great--I'm ready to come to Canada to take it! Let us know how it was received OK? What worked, what didn't. Good luck!
     
  15. Cascadia

    Cascadia FHF Legend

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    Will do. The first set of kids takes it on the 30th (argh, so far away!). I'll see how that goes, and maybe make some adjustments depending on how well the info/activities were received. The second set come on April 4th, so that gives me a good few days to work it out. :)
     
  16. aussieump

    aussieump FHF All Time Great
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    Always happy to assist Cascadia.

    Do have some exam papers if you need in the future. When you need them pm me and I will arrange them.

    Keep up the great work you are undertaking and as Keely has stated you are a role model for your younger umps.

    The group idea I have used for several years now and this seems to bring out more from the attendees.


    As I said keep up the great work

    Aussieump
     
  17. Cascadia

    Cascadia FHF Legend

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    I said I'd let you guys know how it went, so here goes:

    As I anticipated before, 2 hours is NOT long enough to get through everything, especially when there are questions and side-tracked discussions, but since that's all the time I was given (and I don't think they would've been able to pay attention for much longer) I tried to make it work to the best of my ability.

    The kids who took the course (there were 45 in all...which is actually too many for the number of games we have: it's modified rules for U9-U10, so there are only so many games...As much as we try to get more people doing full field games, it's been tough) ranged in age from 10 to 16. The second set was almost exclusively 11 and 12 year olds, and it was AMAZING how much more attentive/less chatty they were than their 13+ counterparts - they were SO much easier to work with (and when I was asking around about why everyone was taking the course, "I want to learn more about the game" and "I want to learn how to umpire" came up much more frequently than "I want to earn some extra money" - I don't think they were sucking up either).

    The "Good Umpire" VS "Bad Umpire" idea (thank you to Diligent!) was pretty successful: after everyone had introduced themselves out loud, I had them get into small groups and think up three for each category. This was good because a) it got them talking to other people in the room, which helped quite a few of them realize that not everyone sees hockey/umpiring the same way that they do (stressing the important of pre-game talk!!), b) got them thinking about umpiring more critically (rather than umpire = someone who blows a whistle when you do something wrong), and c) was a good set-up for goal-setting and identifying personal weaknesses. (thank you to aussieump for suggesting the group work, amongst other things!)

    I had my umpiring kit bag there, and I had them try to guess what could be in it; they got 90% of the stuff in there (along with why it's important to have it). I'm glad we didn't just gloss over this, because some people seemed genuinely surprised about some of the items (some had never thought to bring pen and paper! :baffled: ...and some had planned to umpire in sneakers on a grass field...Oi vey!).

    "Signal Simon Says" was good in that it exposed some confusion over signals, even after we'd gone over them a couple of times, and you could see that most of them got much more confident in their knowledge of the signals as the game went on. However, it went over MUCH better with the younger kids (after three rounds, I had a few still asking to play one more time - sadly, no time for that!). I'm going to try to brainstorm another way of achieving the same results, but that would appeal to an older demographic. For prizes, I went to the dollar store and bought some crazy things (rubber ball, battery-powered fan, Vancouver Canucks sticker, slinky toy etc. etc.), and these (wierdly) seemed to be more appreciated by the older kids. Go figure. ???

    For going over the basics of the rules, after the general break down, I had the first day's group break into smaller groups and come up with game situations where they would blow a foul. This worked only so-so, so I didn't do it for the second day's group (there wasn't time anyway). Instead, I asked for volunteers and we did demos of fouls and also situations of incidental fouls and advantage (did some of this in the first group, but it was harder because there were twice as many of them). I tried to keep it interesting, but as I suspected, this was probably the driest bit of the lesson.

    BIGGEST success (and major props to Keely) was the bingo game. I was able to incorporate many of the original "umpiring quiz" questions into the bingo game, as well as signals, and identification of parts of the field (had to go over this, as it's a bit different from full field), and it exposed a few mix-ups in comprehension. While it took some time handing out cards and chips and waiting for them to fill out all their spaces (I had 24 items for them to put into their cards), this was definitely the most fun part of the whole course.

    Hope this is useful to at least someone! It was fun to do for me, especially with the younger kids. One girl there was 10 and attending with her mom (who I play against in women's hockey) and when they were playing bingo and her mom had "corrected" one of her squares which had turned out to be right originally she said "Geez, mom, I have only played field hockey for 2 years and already I know more than you!" It was way too cute. :)
     
  18. Paul Watts

    Paul Watts FHF All Time Great

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    glad it went well, having done one you can now fine tune it for the future. It's not just the kids who learn from these kind of events, it's the tutors too lol
     
  19. justin-old

    justin-old FHF Legend

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    Great job, Cascadia.... like Paul says, there's nothing like having to teach for revealing any deficiencies in your own knowledge :)
     
  20. aussieump

    aussieump FHF All Time Great
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    Congrats Cascadia

    Job well done


    Aussieump
     

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