Over Officiating

Discussion in 'Game Management & Communication' started by aussieump, Nov 2, 2008.

  1. aussieump

    aussieump FHF All Time Great
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    Watched the Bledisloe Cup rugby last night and viewed and heard some interesting comments out of that game.

    Comments such as the referee was starting to frustrate players with his calls and also becoming nervous resulting in over officiating the game.

    Have you found yourself in such an instance and as such compounded your efforts during that game?

    To me the most important thing the official should have done was to relax.
     
  2. deegum

    deegum FHF Legend

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    Having once upon a time played rugby, and recently read law 20 ," the scrummage" (17 numbered paragraphs, up to six lettered (a to e) sub paragraphs, and xxii notes.
    not counting the approx 27 possible infringements listed with the various penalties..)
    see here
    the referee ( was an umpire when I played.) seemed to be obsessed with detail of "engaging" and totally ignoring what was the most important part of rule

    The player putting in the ball shall

    stand one meter from the scrummage and midway between the two front rows;

    from that position put in the ball...
    at a quick speed straight along the middle line so that it first touches the ground immediately beyond the width of the nearer prop's shoulders.

    a case of umpiring detail and ignoring the real offences.

    Hockey equivalent .... make sure the ball is stationary and on the EXACT spot.. then ignore the hit whistling past the defenders ear.

    Back to the topic.

    "Players must not lift their stick over the heads of other players."

    when that first came out (in Australia) it was accompanied with a stern instruction about its application, I think it required a send off without much notice

    I had the privilege of being the first in the district to umpire it, with two combative teams.

    (I can't recall if it was also the first match where metal sticks were banned or not.)

    Absolutely wrecked me trying to apply new the rule fairly- while keeping players on the field.

    Fellow umpire didn't fare much better.
     
  3. keely

    keely FHF Legend

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    When I'm struggling in a game and feel like I'm blowing the whistle too often and probably over-officiating, I try getting back to basics.

    Mostly, I focus on umpiring with my voice and not my whistle. Talking out the advantages and "play ons" keeps you active while keeping the whistle away from your mouth. Naturally, you start looking for reasons to make that a viable proposition, meaning reasons why you shouldn't blow your whistle - maybe that stick tackle wasn't so bad, look, she's ridden out the tackle, off she goes - and you're explaining it to the players at the same time.

    I know I'm in trouble when I stop talking to the players, so getting back to that will get me back to my game.

    Saying to yourself on the pitch "I need to relax" rarely is enough to get you to actually do so and let the game flow more naturally. You need concrete techniques that produce a relaxed state usually distract you from the end result - like that above. When you are performing better you will relax. Other tricks like repeating positively-associated keywords to yourself, deep diaphragmatic breathing, consciously slowing down physical gestures like signalling can send the right messages to your subconscious.

    Hope that helps, and I'm looking forward to hearing other ideas on how to handle that situation.
     
  4. aussieump

    aussieump FHF All Time Great
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    Agree Keely that just saying relax is not suffice but having a relaxation program that you can adopt and adjust if needed during a game.

    I suppose it is easier in one manner for us in hockey as there are two umpires so the play can move away from your area and create the mental break that may be needed. As you mention the need to talk through calls etc becomes more important . allowing the advanatge call etc work on bringing yourself back into control of your emmotions.

    I believe in playing with the passion and also to umpire with passion and remember to take out the emotion to allow you to focus and retain calm and relaxed during a game.
     
  5. controller

    controller FHF Legend

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    agree keely, voice is better than the whistle to get the game going again from any problems.
     

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