line-up

Discussion in 'Indoor' started by Goalie, Dec 19, 2007.

  1. Goalie

    Goalie FHF Regular Player

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    So indoor season is starting, and I was wondering what kind of line-ups there are for indoor. I think the most used line-up is with two (left/right) defenders, one centre and 2 atackers (left right). But are there any others that work well? For example if you want one that is more defensive, what would you people on here who play indoor suggest? (we are going to play on a higher level then we are used to, so I think focus a bit on defense might be better to start with)
     
  2. NicfromSweden

    NicfromSweden FHF All Time Great
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    i have seen teams that position their forwars about 2-3 meters behind the centerline and position their midfielder just a meter or so ahead of the defenders so they try to make the spaces smaller
     
  3. keely

    keely FHF Legend

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    When you say "line-up", do you mean formation when in possession of the ball or without?

    In my parts there are two common ways to "break the ball out" when in possession from a 9m push, but a myriad of options when "circling" the opponent's 9m push.
     
  4. Goalie

    Goalie FHF Regular Player

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    Without. So just how you start, and draw it on paper before the match lol
     
  5. NicfromSweden

    NicfromSweden FHF All Time Great
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    personaly i would try to make the space as small as possible in my own half of the pitch and by no cirkomstances you should allowe them to get in to the cirkle and if they do try to force them out.
    work as a team and talk a lot to eachother so you can cover all the areas which are open

    if your biggest problem will be their offence then just try to jam your team together and realy on counter attacks and PCs after all a win is a win even if the score is 1-0 if you can make their team frustrated then they will start to take chances which you can use against them and make quick counter attacks

    good luck
     
  6. Goalie

    Goalie FHF Regular Player

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    So still 2-1-2 but more compact? Well I think, since we suddenly play so much higher, going for a more defensive style of playing is just best to start with, and indeed frustrate them. It's a shame we don't have much possibility to train indoor (read barely any). Counter attacks seem to be very succesfull, and the fun part is you can also give an assist as a goalkeeper :p

    Thanks lol I'll just try to keep the goal as clean as possible! rofl
     
  7. NicfromSweden

    NicfromSweden FHF All Time Great
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    yes i promote 2-1-2 but i have seen variations of 1-2-2 where the first defender is really defencive i mean he is standing in the cirkle as a libero and 2 defenders playing as normal defenders but i have also seen 2-2-1 where one player is offencive but the others are pritty defencive

    what you choose is something you have to talk about in your team but all players must agree on what you are going to do and then fight for it
     
  8. keely

    keely FHF Legend

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    Goalie:

    We'll have our two "systems" decided at the beginning of the game, the defensive (circling their 9m) and offensive (our 9m possession). Most teams in my area start with a 1-2-2-1 (from the back) for an offensive set as it usually creates a numerical advantage in the midfield if the opposition plays a 3-man zone.

    Your "line-up" of 1-2-1-2 from a defensive standpoint would be a traditional 3-man zone as we call it, with two wide attackers and one midfield "circling" the ball, and two defenders behind the midfield who is playing the "point" of the "V" (if I understand you correctly). In my area we find the 3-man zone to be easy to break when you're playing against a strong team so we generally use one of the following two options.

    My team in particular often plays a 4-man zone to turn over the ball, where the widest two players are charged with cutting off any board passes and pressure the ball to go to one of the deeper middle two players in the zone, who play up and back from each other depending on which side of the court the ball is on.

    There are two other forms of a 4-man zone that we use: what we call a "sliding four" that is the most defensive of the varieties, where instead of the zone creating a large bowl as it does in the first example, it's a zig-zag (if that makes any sense). If the ball is on the left side, the first forward cuts off the board ball, then a teammate is diagonally back, a third diagonally up, a fourth diagonally back. When the ball switches across to the other defender, the top two players shift so the board ball is cut off, the back two basically stay where they are. This zone tends to set up further away from the ball.

    The other 4-man zone is for high-pressure situations is a "diamond" because the first four players create that shape. When the ball switches across the top runner scoots across to put pressure on the ball, and the rest of the diamond shifts with her. The side of the diamond closest to the ball cuts off the boards. The ball is often picked off by the 4th player in the zone.

    Hopefully that'll give you some other ideas. Changing zones during the course of a game is a great way to create confusion in the other team and disrupt their rhythm, especially when they are better than you that is sometimes the only way to get an edge.

    Good luck!
     
  9. NicfromSweden

    NicfromSweden FHF All Time Great
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    keely do you find the 2-1-2 to easy to break?
    if you look at the last indoor world cup most teams plays 2-1-2 and teams like club an der alster and berliner plays 2-1-2 its the normal german line up
    i have never seen the line ups you are talking about but i find them intressting and they got another goal to where you want to steal the ball from the oponents
    in the 2-1-2 most teams use wide defenders which covers the sideboards and the forwards letting the ball get past them on the sideboards and just cover the pass thru them and the mid player stays a couple of meters behind them to cover the passes thru the middle the objective is to try to make the oponent to try to dribble the ball allong the sideboard where the forward and mid player will guide the oponent into the defender who will make the tackle
    so by the sound of it your system is to make the tackle in the midle of the field and the one we are using near the sideboards the advantage as i see it to make the tackle near the sideboards is that the oponent only got one way to go while in the middle he got more choices
     
  10. keely

    keely FHF Legend

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    Because the 2-1-2 3-man zone is the most common, basic formation, I think in general it is the easiest to break because teams have the most experience in playing against it.

    We don't spend a lot of time dribbling the ball in indoor in my parts - why would you when the ball travels so much faster than we can run? Our optimal indoor hockey is 3 passes -> in the net in 5 seconds or less, whereas I've noticed that indoor in other places like the UK, for example, do use a lot more dribbling.

    So all of our systems are aimed at forcing the opposition to make a poor pass, hopefully into the middle of the zone either straight through or by the angle they must send the ball off the boards. They take away certain angles and invite the ball to go through others - hopefully to our sticks. Likewise when we have the ball, we're trying to shift the zone, break the formation and expose lanes where we can send the ball in order to get into the attacking circle.
     
  11. Wassie

    Wassie FHF Legend

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    Looking forward to the advancement of the Canadian game on the world stage with this new style/formation!

    Look out Nic and Germany.
     
  12. Soulja Goalie

    Soulja Goalie FHF Starter

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    Our formation is 3-2. One mid stays back and the rest are like wingers. one forwand goes into the d and the other one is outside the d, basiclly theguy that picks up the clearances.
     

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