Indoor Coaching

Discussion in 'Indoor' started by BlindGoalie613, Sep 30, 2016.

  1. BlindGoalie613

    BlindGoalie613 FHF All Time Great

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    Been asked to coach indoor for my local club. Apart from watching a heap of it on Youtube to get a feel for the pacing of the game, what's general consensus of HOW the game is played.
     
  2. Mac

    Mac FHF Legend

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    Everything I know about coaching indoor hockey was imparted to me by Andy Halliday.* I'll give you a very brief synopsis of the hours he spent with me...

    Basics are important. As the pitch size is smaller, the ball lighter and faster, first touch becomes correspondingly more important. Passes must, wherever possible, go to the open stick. Controlling on the reverse is more difficult and can lead to a ball popping up, which is often given as a raised ball foul. Time spent transferring from reverse to open side allows opposition players to press, which is a recipe for disaster indoors for a ball carrier; no 3D to get you out. So, ball pace and accuracy are paramount.

    Watch Germany or Bundesliga games. Everything is open side and (and this is the kicker) often one touch. That requires technical ability but it makes a team much better.

    To achieve both of the above (open and one touch) players need to be low; not outdoors low, but even lower. Work on "low and pro".

    A basic team shape is like the 5 on a dice. 2-1-2. Set up out of possession, in the middle third of the pitch, in this shape with the forward 2 narrower than (and in line with the inside feet of) the defensive 2 (so your Dice-5 is slightly trapezoidal). Cut down all passing lanes and be patient. Do not come out of your shape initially; just wait for the opposition to give you the ball - they will. Your Keeper should be active and think about sweeping at the top of the D.

    When attacking start by going between your back two, repeatedly. Aim to move the opposition out of their Dice-5. Build space down the left, which is the strong side to attack indoors as your left back can sling up the boards to a leading forward who will receive open side. Or aim to move your left back infield, push the right back higher and have your middle player drop into the vacant left side space, becoming a 1-2-2 (the Czechs do this well). Playing down the right encourages forwards to receive on their reverse, turning possession over, so avoid that initially.

    The game is fluid, so don't be afraid to have players rotate around the pitch. Support the ball carrier.

    Practise using the boards.

    Most of all, have fun!

    This is something I have used to develop drills from, although YMMV. I can't find the systems booklet which better illustrates what I'm saying above. Stupid internet.

    *CLANG goes the sound of a name dropping...

    EDIT: Added bit about GK sweeping.
     
    #2 Mac, Sep 30, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2016
    Marqi - AR and redumpire like this.
  3. Mick Mason

    Mick Mason FHF Top Player

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    I coach juniors in indoor and the very first thing we work on is getting off the boards as soon as you gain possession. Getting off the boards (3metres or more) opens up another passing option.
    Second thing is staying strong on the ball and finding passes to your team mates strong side. If the left forward has to move to the boards to pick up the ball and they stay strong and rotate in (turn and burn) they have a whole field of passing options, if they winkle the ball up the boards they need to be very fast or they just get shut down by the defender flat-sticking against the boards.
    Third thing, don't be frightened to pass diagonally across the field to the board behind your leading center. An example....
    Defending team deployed in a dice setup with your forwards and center making lateral leads to draw defenders out of position and away from boards. Left back receives pass from right back. Center and right forward have just started to run to left of field which opens the whole of the right hand board (if defenders take the bait). Center releads to right forward pocket and left back aims to get ball between pressing defenders and hit board so that ball heads down to meet your center in the pocket. Same thing can be done down other side but it is harder to get the angle past the stick of the defender (opp' right forward) who should be covering that exact pass as soon as your left back passes to your right back.
    After doing this pass even once the defence will cover the center tighter and then it opens the boards for the backs to pass around the outside of the pressing forwards. If your forwards (3 inc' center) are rotating anti clockwise the left back can make easy passes up the board to a player who is coming down the boards to them.

    Defence is easier if you retreat a bit and allow the attacking team half the field. It compresses your press so that balls are less likely to get through because players are "less out of position" if they get sucked in by the attackers leads. Give the attack the boards as long as you always mark in front of their forwards so they cannot get the ball.
    The backs and center have to prevent the pass being completed to their mark ("between the ball and your mark" marking), not be content to allow them to take the ball and tackle them ("between the player and the goal" marking).

    Everybody on both teams should understand what is happening (it is a fairly simple game) and so the dominant team is often the side that is willing to make quick plays and take some risks. One-touch passes to spaces expecting your team mates to see that same space as an opportunity and be headed there often works great and leads to shots and is where you want your team to be as quickly as you can manage.
    A lot of our practice time is used practicing skills. Good skills ,means fasters plays, faster plays means more shots at goal.

    I hope this helps
     
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  4. BlindGoalie613

    BlindGoalie613 FHF All Time Great

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    Brilliant, thanks.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk, sponsored by Beikou Hockey
     

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