Homemade Stick

Discussion in 'General Hockey Chit-Chat' started by TimmyNeutron, Dec 5, 2017.

  1. TimmyNeutron

    TimmyNeutron FHF Newbie

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    Hi Guys

    Has anyone of you ever thought about making your own sticks. Of course you have and craggsy is the perfect example of somebody who made a company out of it.

    I don't mean starting up a company letting the sticks get produced somewhere and then selling them (just to make clear, I'm in love with craggsys sticks and own 3 of them already).

    But I mean just for the sake of fullfilment having done something with your own hands even when it doesn't reach the quality of a professional made stick. Just as a little hobby in the spare time, kinda like Thomas Krille (TK founder) started up with his stuff.

    Does anybody know how it works creating a mold for the hockey stick and I know how to laminate stuff with flachs fibers for our student racing team but how does it work with something completely close and empty inside, if anybody has some suggestions or pointers in the right direction I would be happy for anything hockey related. ( Already found myself in some forums for boats and aeroplanes )

    Cheers Tim
     
  2. jamesev

    jamesev FHF Top Player

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    I guess why would you want to, apart from being and engineering exercise like the Bugatti Veyron which cost more to produce that the price tag in each. If the intent is to produce a one off for own use it wouldn’t be cost effective compared to just buying a stick. Hence the original thesis of doing it simply as an engineering exercise.
     
  3. peterwins

    peterwins FHF Legend

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    When Thomas Kille started making sticks in his home, it involved wood wrapped with fiberglass and a grip. Later carbon fiber was also wrapped around the wood, but by then he was having the sticks made in India and Pakistan. Composites came later.

    If you want to see someone who started off an engineering project to make his own stick and it became a company, check out
    https://phoenix-hockey-usa.myshopify.com/

    It is very tough and has taken Phil years of effort. (Full disclosure: Phil is a friend who also plays masters hockey for the USA).
     
  4. TimmyNeutron

    TimmyNeutron FHF Newbie

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    Of course like I wrote it is only for the fullfilement of having done by yourself and the engineering excercise. I am totally aware that it will not reach the professional quality nor the cost efficiency but that is in no way the goal of it. Just searching for the pointer in the right direction where to start properly to save up on some dead roads.
     
  5. TimmyNeutron

    TimmyNeutron FHF Newbie

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    Hi Peter
    Thanks for the info, I saw their website ones but didn't really took a note of the story behind it.
    Of course you are right with Thomas Kille that were way simpler startings and in no way to compare to todays technichal starting challenges.
    This is in no way thought as a way to startup something it is just my interest in the technical excercie and knowledge behind as a student.
    Do you know further behind the scenes how it all started, which method they use to inject the resin etc. or hit up the contact for me and maybe they let me get to know some of their secrets.
    I am totally aware this is unlikely since it is their company capital basically.

    Cheers Tim
     
  6. peterwins

    peterwins FHF Legend

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    Phil spent many years to get his secret sauce right so I really doubt he is going to share too much. Sorry. Videos on website will give you some ideas. Also, just cut an old stick into segments to see how other brands handle it. Watch your hands though.
     
  7. TimmyNeutron

    TimmyNeutron FHF Newbie

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    So
    I am not sure if people are really interested in this but I just thought about using this as a little documentation for me in the worst case.

    I had a long chat with the head of the engineering department of our student racing team, which is in his spare time working for a company building and laminating prototype stuff for the greater part of the german car industry (porsche,vw, that kind of stuff).
    With this amount of knowledge I expected some sort of "that's easy just do it this way" sort of answer but in the end I had to realise this is going to be at the higher end of the effort scala in projects I could've picked. Maybe picking it up as a student project in the next semester with further research.

    The key fact making everything harder is the hollow inside and closed all around part of hockey sticks. Could be done with a resing injection method of excess pressure inside the stick or negative pressure around the stick. He also mentioned the laminating could be easier with fibers which had pre injected resin but then a heating / melting / molding would be required.

    I watched some videos of factories in Pakistan and actually realised he was pretty close with his guess, they use fibers with pre injected resin and mold them with excess pressure and heat.
    Works but it's kinda inconstistent due to the packing and rolling they do and you need equipment to heat and press which I am not able to get my hands on at the moment.

    So I decided to start with a 3D Solidworks model of a stick, which is getting milled out of wood so I have a first prototype to lay my hands on.

    Future Steps:

    Make a simple mould out of it and use some old school GFK laminating used in boat making industry to get a first rubbish non wood prototype.
    Get my head around how to apply the laminating process our student racing team uses to laminate the nose of their car (which is also closed all around) and apply it to a hockey stick.
    Get some proper metal moulds which can be used for some different methods of injecting resin into fiber.


    In the bottom line should be a picture of the first few hours tinkering around in Lightworks. Remember this is not a practicable design yet, it's just what looked nice and interesting but still feel free to feedback what you always wanted to try on a stick and what will definitely not work in this one (octagonal handle ??)

    Cheers Tim
     

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