Which gear? Goalkeeper kit usage and maintenance guide

Discussion in 'Goalie Zone' started by Folmer, Aug 19, 2015.

  1. Folmer

    Folmer FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2007
    Messages:
    2,449
    Likes Received:
    559
    Introduction and disclamer
    Buying a set of goalkeeping kit is a costly, long term investment. To get the most out of this investment it is very important to properly use and maintain the kit. Good maintenance of a kit can extend the lifetime significantly and thus save you a lot of money.

    Given below are guidelines, tips and trick for using and maintaining your GK gear. It is by no means a definitive guide and there are certainly other options available, but these are my personal recommendations.

    Please be aware that any repairs made to your gear are at your own risk. The fact that I have had good results does not guarantee the same for you. If you do not feel comfortable doing them, please let a professional do it.

    I would like to thank @animal for his (unawares) contributions to this guide.
     
    The.Rampage.Rado and animal like this.
  2. Folmer

    Folmer FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2007
    Messages:
    2,449
    Likes Received:
    559
    Usage tips
    Most kit use is pretty self-explanatory, but here are some tips to expand the life of specific item.

    Kickers

    To get the perfect fit, first make sure you have the correct size. When in doubt check the manufacturer’s sizing table. Next loosen all straps and place your foot, with shoe, in the kicker and put it as far forward as possible; the base of the tongue should sit right at the ankle joint. Fasten the straps so the kicker is held in place firmly, but not so tight that the shoe is forced backwards. Once the front straps are fastened correctly they can be kept closed.

    Toe-straps on the outside of kickers should go underneath the heel straps to prevent the buckle rotating underfoot. If the front straps pops up over your toes try one or more of the following:
    • refit your kicker as described above,
    • loosen the front strap a bit so the heel straps pull the kicker further forward,
    • use cable-ties or duct tape to fasten the front strap to the rear,
    • cut studs from the shoes to create a groove in which the strap sits.

    If possible (like with Obo kickers) switch regularly between left and right. This will significantly prolong the lifespan of the kickers.

    Never put the tongue of the kicker in front of the legguard.

    New (Obo) kickers may be shaped using this guide: http://www.obogoalkeeping.com/engage/conditioningkickers/engage.html
    If the kickers cause abrasions on the ankles they can be stored closed with a bottle in the opening.

    Shorts
    Take your shoes off before putting on the shorts, otherwise you may get the studs stuck on the padding and rip the inside.
    Always (if applicable) wear an outer shell over your girdle.

    Body protection
    Always wear a shirt over your body protection. Not only do the rules require it, but it ensures nothing can get stuck in or under the protector which is a lot safer.

    Bag
    Don’t overload the bag; it is for GK gear, not for team stuff like bibs, balls, first aid kits, etc. Cramming gear in the bag or the bag in e.g. the boot of your car will put loads on the kit for which they are not designed.
    Never use the bag as a seat. If your teammates do it, some mild physical persuasion is allowed to remove them.

    Storing gear
    • After each training session or game, take the gear out of the bag to allow it to dry. This helps prevent mould which will ruin your kit and will smell like something died.
    • Close heel straps of the kickers to keep the kickers in shape.
    • Wipe your helmet dry with a clean cloth to prevent mould.
    • Undo elastic bands when storing to preserve the elasticity.
    • If you have tied knots in straps, remove them after use to prolong their life.
    • Don’t store your kit in hot places like your car or near a radiator. Heat is bad for foam.
     
    #2 Folmer, Aug 19, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2016
    MunchkinGK likes this.
  3. Folmer

    Folmer FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2007
    Messages:
    2,449
    Likes Received:
    559
    Checking your gear
    The first and most important part in maintaining your GK gear is preventing the need for major repairs. This is done by regularly checking your gear for tears, dents, screws loosening, rust forming, seams coming loose, holes in shorts and body protection, etc. Do this preferably after every match, so you have the time for repairs before the next game.

    Things to check are:
    Kickers: Check the bottom, join of the tongue, strap holes, straps.
    Legguards: Check all the seams, especially at the joining of the inner and outer part and where the tongue of the kicker sits in the legguard, strap holes, straps
    Shorts: Check all the seams, the slide pad, padding, look for holes
    Groin/pelvic-guard: Check the seams and the elastic bands, check the cup for cracks
    Bodyprotector: Check seams and look for holes
    Elbow guards: Check seams and look for holes
    Hand protectors: Check the stick-hole and all seams for tears, check Velcro and/or elastic bands
    Helmet: Check for cracks, elastic bands, grill fasteners, chin straps, fasten screws, check for loose padding
    Throat protector: Check Velcro, seams, look for holes
    Danglies: Check for cracks
    Bag: Check seams, look for holes

    If the checks listed above are adhered to any replacements or repairs due to wear and tear can be carried out quickly to minimise any disruption to you, your team, coach or club. Any repairs should be carried out as quickly as possible to ensure that gear is always ready for use.

    Check your gear at the completion of the season to ensure that your gear will be in good playing order at the beginning of the next season. You will also be able to organise the purchase of new gear, which will reduce any extra costs to start the next season. This will also enable you to wear any new gear in prior to the start of the next season.

    General maintenance
    Where possible try and wash all the gear at least every month. Washing the gear will not only help to reduce odours, but will prolong the life of all your gear. Some stuff like body armours and shorts can be washed in a machine, but check the labels for washing instructions to be sure.

    Don’t use deodorants or stuff like Fébrèze as it will only temporarily remove the smell and might even attack your gear.

    Washing your gear:
    • Fill your bathtub with lukewarm water with a mild detergent and soak all gear except you helmet.
    • Leave to soak for several hours or till the next day if possible. The pads, kickers and gloves will not remain covered with the solution. It is important that they are turned a couple of times and are re-immersed when possible. (You can use a scrubbing brush to remove any marks and dirt off any equipment if necessary).
    • After soaking, rinse with generous amounts of water. If this is not done it is possible for a skin reaction to occur so it is quite important to ensure a good rinse process is followed.
    • Drain completely and hang the gear on the line. The gear will dry quite well overnight. The gloves need to be stood up to allow water to drain away. If the left hand glove still smells after the washing process put a diluted solution of bleach into it and leave for a short while then rinse thoroughly with clean water.
    • The bag can also be washed in this solution if necessary, as it will absorb odours from the gear it carries.
    Cleaning the helmet
    • The helmet can be cleaned by using a mild detergent and a small brush (toothbrush, dishwash brush or similar will do the job). Rinse to remove any residue and dry thoroughly.
    Repairs
    As not all of us have a money tree in the garden to buy new gear each time something is broken, repairs will be necessary every now and then. When you do buy new gear it is wise to think about what you might need from the old gear, parts from the old kit can often be used as donor material for repairs.

    Keep a small tool kit and some spare parts like straps, screws, buckles, clips, etc in your bag in case you need repairs during training or matches.

    Foam repairs
    On seam or parts which have to remain flexible use a glue which remains flexible when dry, Preferably use a glue gun or Loctite as recommended by Obo in their video.
    On stopping surfaces a hard drying glue can be used. It can even be reinforced by “laminating” sports tape with glue to create a hard, tough cover.

    Sewing
    Most repairs can be done with a strong sewing machine, of course a needle and thread will also do the job. For the thicker parts a sailmaker’s palm and needle may be used. Always use a strong thread. Sometimes special tools like a curved needle will help with small corners and other hard to sew items.

    It is worth the effort and time to make good, strong repairs. It can be necessary to undo seems with a seam ripper to create strong connections.

    If you do not feel comfortable doing the repairs yourself you can bring the gear to a professional like a saddler.
     
    Roadside and MunchkinGK like this.
  4. MunchkinGK

    MunchkinGK FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2013
    Messages:
    2,216
    Likes Received:
    289
    Location:
    London
    Thanks for this. I'm going to send this info to all the keepers in our ladies section. Because apparently I'm the only one who ever looks after anything.
     
  5. animal

    animal FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2006
    Messages:
    3,450
    Likes Received:
    392
    Location:
    Townsville Australia
    Old but not bad methinks
     

    Attached Files:

    The.Rampage.Rado and AndyGaut like this.
  6. Folmer

    Folmer FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2007
    Messages:
    2,449
    Likes Received:
    559
    Definitely still valid. That's the one where I borrowed some text from (hope you don't mind).
     
  7. Peter Bradby

    Peter Bradby FHF Regular Player

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2013
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    22
    Location:
    Horley, Surrey
  8. Stephen65

    Stephen65 FHF Legend

    Joined:
    May 11, 2010
    Messages:
    541
    Likes Received:
    141
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    On the subject of repairs: a roll of strong duct tape is a useful thing to keep in your kitbag
     
  9. Folmer

    Folmer FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2007
    Messages:
    2,449
    Likes Received:
    559
    Duct tape is good for ad-hoc repairs, but should be removed immediately after the training or match. The glue in the tape bonds to the surface of the foam and will tear off the top layer when removing it after a longer period.
     
  10. asahartz

    asahartz FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,138
    Likes Received:
    379
    Location:
    Notts
    Stick/s:
    Slazenger SZR Aero 160
    But as posted elsewhere, it also makes a cheap sun/rain visor!
     
    Jaimie likes this.
  11. TheAmiableMedic

    TheAmiableMedic FHF Newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2015
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Manchester
    Is the OBO anti odour spray any good for getting rid of the hockey smell? Just played a brutal 3 hours in the macunian rain and it's brought all the smell up to the surface...
     
  12. animal

    animal FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2006
    Messages:
    3,450
    Likes Received:
    392
    Location:
    Townsville Australia
    I think you will find it is a powder. And I don't know.
     
  13. BlindGoalie613

    BlindGoalie613 FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2014
    Messages:
    1,893
    Likes Received:
    655
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Stick/s:
    Beikou Drag 90
    I'll be testing it and the obo blinders some time in the next few weeks
     
    animal likes this.
  14. animal

    animal FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2006
    Messages:
    3,450
    Likes Received:
    392
    Location:
    Townsville Australia
    Keep us posted!
     
  15. BlindGoalie613

    BlindGoalie613 FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2014
    Messages:
    1,893
    Likes Received:
    655
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Stick/s:
    Beikou Drag 90
    I feel like the blinders will either be phenomenal or useless
     
    Jaimie likes this.
  16. sanabas

    sanabas FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2007
    Messages:
    2,725
    Likes Received:
    1,050
    The powder seems to work pretty well, though my kit never gets particularly bad.

    Blinders look like they do their job well, but a strip of tape also does the same job, and tape doesn't cost $50. So I've only sold them, not used them myself.
     
  17. nemo

    nemo FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2013
    Messages:
    1,998
    Likes Received:
    595
    Location:
    Coventry
    Two quid roll of tape vrs 20 quid piece of plastic ...........
     
  18. AndyGaut

    AndyGaut FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Messages:
    4,291
    Likes Received:
    288
    Location:
    Essex, UK
    Stick/s:
    TK GK 1.1, OBO Fatboy, Malik Black Magic
    I'm in the tape camp, it's simple easy to use and I think it is better for blocking the sun. Also if most internationals are still using tape over the blinders I think it says a lot
     
    nemo likes this.
  19. asahartz

    asahartz FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,138
    Likes Received:
    379
    Location:
    Notts
    Stick/s:
    Slazenger SZR Aero 160
    Tape also helps to keep the rain out... (important to those of us that wear specs cos you can't wipe the rain off through the cage!)
     
    Goalmutt likes this.
  20. BlindGoalie613

    BlindGoalie613 FHF All Time Great

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2014
    Messages:
    1,893
    Likes Received:
    655
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Stick/s:
    Beikou Drag 90
    You and me both buddy.
     

Share This Page