Field hockey mom with questions about eye goggles...

Discussion in 'Other Gear Questions & Reviews' started by viviene, Aug 16, 2009.

  1. viviene

    viviene FHF Newbie

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    My 12-year-old daughter starts field hockey practice tomorrow for the first time. We live in the United States in Pennsylvania. I'm trying hard not to be over protective, however, I would like to ask about eye protection. Dear daughter says no high sticks are allowed so she's not concerned about wearing goggles. I say since she wears glasses and while high sticks aren't allowed, things happen (like getting hit with the ball!).

    I want her to be able to see what she's doing and also protect her eyes. What would you recommend? I bow to your experience as I have none to draw on.
     
  2. Magpie

    Magpie Administrator
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    Here is an old thread to help you out http://www.fieldhockeyforum.com/index.php/topic,264.0.html, you can contact SavageFH for advice. As a new member you may not be able to send a PM (personal message) so just reply with to this thread that you want to make contact with somebody and one of the mods or myself will do it for you.
     
  3. g9

    g9 FHF Legend

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    Not quite that high sticks aren't allowed, but the umpiring standard is that high sticks are subject to danger, meaning they should be called if there are players in proximity of the swing. But if her coaches are doing their job teaching good techniques, the incidents of raised balls should be limited. And while it may take a while to bring the teams up to a standard of play, you should see something less than mass chaos out there...really, the players, coaches and umpires DO know what they are doing and gets better as the season goes on!
    So, yes, accidents do happen and balls to get raised, but wearing glasses alone should not cause you to automatically leap to goggles. A few years back I did recommend goggles because the field being used by the middle school team I was coaching at the time was so bad that pop-ups were unavoidable, but I would not do it as a general rule for all field players on normal fields. My advise would be to take a deep breath and let her practice with her team and see how it goes...if you still feel after some time that goggles are necessary, there is no NFHS rule to prohibits them, so long as they are field-hockey specific.
     
  4. keely

    keely FHF Legend

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    Trust your daughter, she's right. Eye damage is a minimal risk. Your concerns should be directed towards proper shinguards (molded one-piece designs specifically for field hockey, not soccer) and possibly gloves.
     
  5. Libero

    Libero FHF Starter

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    I concur although it eye damage is or facial damage in general is pretty rare a good gun shield moulded by a dentist should be on the essential list over it is a requirement for juniors otherwise they cannot play. As for glasses you might look at at a pair with plastic lens if the worst should happen and perhaps some form of leash or croaky to make sure they stay on during play
     
  6. g9

    g9 FHF Legend

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    Good point Libero! A solid color mouthguard (not clear or white) is required equipment equipment. There are a few brands out there which are custom molded and fit so well that the "I can't breathe or talk" argument can't be made about them...these are not the boil and form at home types though! Well worth the cost and yes, those injuries are far more common, so it's literally a "put your money where your mouth is" argument!
     
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  7. redumpire

    redumpire FHF All Time Great
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    Speaking as someone who had a very serious eye injury (a massive blood clot on my optic nerve) following a freak accident during a hockey training session, I would say that goggles are entirely unnecessary, unless they make the wearer feel more protected and therefore more comfortable on the pitch. On the very few occasions that I have played since my injury (I took up umpiring followng my recovery - no cheap jokes about umpires and eyesight thanks!) I have not worn any eye protection at all. As for my teeth (and testicles, though I appreciate that they're not an issue in this case!) I always ensure that they're well-protected.

    I hope that helps and reassures?

    David
     
  8. CCG

    CCG FHF Legend

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    Just a thought - would some contact lenses not be a possibility for hockey for her opposed to goggles and wearing glasses?

    I do agree about a good mouthguard - I would definately not have half my teeth had it not been for mine. I wouldn't always say a custom is necessary, but a decent one (Shockdoctor & Opro do good home versions) with gel in the gumshield for added protection works a treat, and only costs about £20 (although you can get Opro Customs for about £30 I know) so it's well worth it, as I say had I not had a decent mouthguard I would have many false teeth and I'm only 15!
     
  9. joe cole

    joe cole FHF Regular Player

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    I don't know if contact lenses are at the state of technology where they are good for sport yet.

    My girlfriend wears glasses and from what I gather she needs to wear them if she ever decided to do any sport (not for a while :rolleyes: ) The contacts she has steam up, become uncomfortable with sweat etc.

    I'm not entriely sure on the issue though, someone with glasses will hopefully have a more informed opinion, but I would think at the moment they may be either prohibitively expensive or not suitable.

    Also... Something I do know on the science front. Contacts do not correct your vision as well as glasses. To this end her hockey would be adversely affected by an inability to judge distances etc as accurately as with glasses... Something to think about.
     
  10. Mr Bean

    Mr Bean FHF Regular Player

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    Joe, it completely depends on the type of contact lenses you wear, The hard version or the crappy soft ones that attract dust and really irritate your eyes. Not sure about the age requirements for contact lenses in the states but over here I know you had to be 18 before you could be prescribed them.. (That may have changed now?)

    My mum used to have issues with buying a Helmet due to wearing glasses but since moving to contact lenses she's had no problems, they give just as good vision as if you were wearing glasses.

    Im short sighted (cant see stuff far away) So I was the guinea pig when she first got them, They are very weird to get used to at first but after 10 mins of having them in, you dont notice them anymore. (just remember to take them out, not leave them in for 2days :eek:oh: )
     
  11. joe cole

    joe cole FHF Regular Player

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    fairplay. I forget the technical term but I know my girlfriend said her contacts don't fix something in her eyesight to do with spacial awareness.
     
  12. Dan

    Dan FHF Regular Player

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    If she doesn't have have true sports or safety glasses, I'd at least recommend that you make sure her glasses have polycarbonate lenses. The standard "plastic" lenses is also called "CR39". CR39 can shatter. Polycarbonate is much more impact resistant than CR39. It does scratch more easily but you can get a coating that makes it somewhat more scratch-resistant. Sports or safety glasses are frames that are also impact resistant and shaped to not have sharp edges that could poke into an eye easily.
     
  13. viviene

    viviene FHF Newbie

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    Thank you so much everyone!

    I did speak with her coach today and she first suggested we put an eyeglass cord on my daughter's glasses so they don't come flying off (which I did get her but she refused to use as she thought she'd look like an old lady!). But now that the coach has spoken suddenly Mom isn't so dumb after all LOL.

    She also said if my daughter thinks she'd like to get the goggles after she's gotten her feet wet a bit then we can certainly do that. We did get a mouthguard made by my daughter's dentist so we're good to go on that and we did get her the shin guards that were recommended here when I asked about them previously.

    My daughter's glasses have polycarbonate lenses and her frames are plastic so we should be good to go. Dear daughter is only 12 so we're not contemplating contacts yet but that too shall come to pass.

    Thank you so much for all the great information. I'm trying very hard to just be supportive and not panic. Her first practice was today and she had a great time and was telling me she could "feel the burn" in her legs and how great it was. Thanks again!
     
  14. CCG

    CCG FHF Legend

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    Glad to hear she enjoyed herself. The burn never leaves - every start of season it'll return! :yes:
     
  15. viviene

    viviene FHF Newbie

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    Just thought I'd check in. My daughter is on day 6 of field hockey practice and has been assigned a fullback position. She said her breathing is much better and she's come from being last to finish her mile run to being 4th out of 20 players to finish. She is absolutely loving it. She's been practicing at home and riding her bike a mile every other day and running an extra mile the days she doesn't ride her bike. I've never seen her so excited about anything. I'm so glad she is loving this. :yes:
     
  16. Dan

    Dan FHF Regular Player

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    Viviene, that's great! My daughter is also a week into practices and was happy today that they did circuit training instead of lots of running. but it sounds like your daughter is really getting into the running part. It really comes in handy (my daughter and I are both goalies and running is *not* our favorite part).
     
  17. tottski

    tottski FHF Starter

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    On the subject of contact lenses for sport:

    I would say that it entirely depends on the type of eyesight problem you have and the type/quality of the lens you use as to if they will do the job for you.
    Personally I cannot think of anything worse than playing in glasses, the though of sweat running across them and blurring my vision is not my idea of helping my vision during a match.

    I have worn daily disposables for sport for years now, I don't think I have ever had one dry up,tear, or fall out during games. Nor do I find they attract dust or cause irritation. I also find they provide the best peripheral vision, unlike glasses or goggles which would have some blind sports or distorted areas; So for me they are undoubtedly a better option than wearing glasses or goggles.

    At the same time in the time i have played I have only been hit in the face near my eyes once (split eyebrow) so I don't think it's a high percentage risk for your daughter.
     
  18. woody55

    woody55 FHF Regular Player

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    Nice to see your child being successful as hockey is a great game to keep fit and play. I also play fullback which is a position which requires a lot of running as you can attack and defend as fullback's are ran at by wingers a lot. Keep her fit as its a demanding position! And i do recommend proper shin pads for hockey as i use football/soccer one's and they are dangerous, i just hate my TK shin pads as they aren't comfortable but definitely get a mouth guard and contact lenses. If you ask me eye goggles will make her look bad and maybe a bit too much.
     

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