Drills for Beginners *Indoor

Discussion in 'Training Tips & Coaching' started by fhgoalie9552, Dec 9, 2016.

  1. fhgoalie9552

    fhgoalie9552 FHF Starter

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    I am coaching a U12 team. So they are just beginners. I am a keeper, not the most familiar with field drills. Does anyone have any basic drills I should start with teaching them.
    Thanks in advance.
     
    #1 fhgoalie9552, Dec 9, 2016
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2016
  2. Mick Mason

    Mick Mason FHF Top Player

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    Here is some of the stuff I use for players from 12 years up to 18. Distances (size of the drill) are the only thing that changes. I introduce the warmup drills on day one and the players do them regularly all season.
    These are the drills I use for warmups at training before we explore game play. Don't get hung up on the boards, probably 80% of passes are plain passes to open players and don't involve the boards. The elimination drill is to teach players to get away from boards so that the boards are then opened up to create another passing lane to their player. Players keep the ball on their stick and out in front so that defender can't read which pass is going to be used. Players rotate position following the ball.
    The trapping and passing warmup is to teach skills, not develop fitness. Players do not go at it full speed, they develop skills and speed up the drill until it tests them. Young players always start out reaching for the ball and accidentally lift it. The drill is to learn how to trap and pass while keeping the ball on the ground.
    Missing man is to help players understand the importance of movement off the ball and fast ball handling. The object is to always have a right angle with the ball in the corner so that the player with the ball always has two passes they can make. Adding a defender creates pressure to get the transfer happening with some speed so the pass stays open. Players have to pass to team mates forestick. If a player has to receive on their backstick then defender is allowed to engage and try to get the ball. In later sessions allow it to evolve into a more random game of piggy in the middle, just don't allow the piggy to tackle rashly. We sometimes do 2 teams of 4 in 2 games (each team donates a piggy to the other game) and players rotate roles. Piggies getting the ball get points, winners are grinners, losers do a lap (you will need another observer to help you keep score on other game).

    We move on to 3 on 3 games. Defense can be 2 defenders and a GK or 3 defenders. Play to the rules. Attack get a corner or a shot they get a point, defenders clear ball up boards (not up centre) they get a point. Then it is onto break the press games.


    I hope this helps
     

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  3. fhgoalie9552

    fhgoalie9552 FHF Starter

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    thank you so much!
     
  4. MKochar

    MKochar FHF Super Star

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    New to a sport? U12?

    Just let them play, give them the rule framework, and let them go.
     
  5. Mick Mason

    Mick Mason FHF Top Player

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    There is a time for that for sure but, they have more fun if they work on the skills that are needed to stay within those rules, like keeping the ball on the ground when trapping and pushing. It sucks the fun out of it if the game keeps stopping for the whistle and it isn't really indoor if you just let things slide. Some 11 year olds can be pretty competitive, give them all a chance to learn the skills.
     
  6. MKochar

    MKochar FHF Super Star

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    well as a PE teacher, all the kids want to do is play games.

    its a TGfU approach. (Teaching Games for Understanding) Just give them the rules, only push, no hit, ball must stay on floor. Let them work through the rest!
     
  7. Mick Mason

    Mick Mason FHF Top Player

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    TGfU is called Game Sense here and conditioned games are a central part of it, as is instruction on skills when kids ask for it. Your "Let them work through the rest!" is a gross oversimplification and risks misrepresenting the concept.
    My experience has been that after getting pinged for breaking the rules the kids are all asking how they can play hockey without breaking the rules (the trigger in Game Sense for introducing skills sessions). It is large part of a coaches job to help them learn the sport and 15-20 minutes learning hockey skills out of an hours training session so they can get more value out of their competition is time well spent. Get some instruction, play conditioned game/s, then let them have at it, has long been a staple of coaching.
     
  8. sanabas

    sanabas FHF All Time Great

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    Think you've misunderstood TGfU a little. Or I misunderstand what you mean by game sense. It's not about a better understanding of what's happening during the actual game, i.e. game sense. It's about teaching the kids skills, not by doing drills that look like drills, but by doing games that happen to work on a skill, i.e. teaching games. I used to do a lot of the 4 week school clinics, roughly 4 x 45 minute sessions for classes of 20-25, aged anywhere from 5-14. The first 3 weeks were all 'TGfU' (a phrase I hadn't heard before this thread) and the 4th was an actual game. The regular games were rob the nest (dribbling), hockey octopus (dribbling, tackling), a softball inspired game (hitting, dribbling, passing & trapping) and 'number hockey' (half the kids on each side of a rectangle, numbered off. Call out a number (or 2 or 3), those two run around outside and into the middle. Worked on dribbling & tackling as well). Same deal doing the active after school program, (administered by Aussie sports commission, with people from all sorts of sports running their own AASC sessions) the focus was on games that happen to work on stuff. The older and/or the more competitive/serious about hockey they get, the better they tend to be at having the attention span to do something that seems more like a boring drill, instead of a game that serves a similar function to a drill.
     
  9. Mick Mason

    Mick Mason FHF Top Player

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    Everything you say is correct, but TGfU IS Game Sense here (or probably more accurately Game Sense started life here as TGfU ). Yes you misunderstood what I said.. It is all about playing games that encourage learning (both skills and positioning, which is just another skill), and providing skills instruction when the kids ask/need.
    The hockeyEd document....
    http://hockeyed.hockey.org.au/pluginfile.php/48/mod_page/content/13/Game Sense Principles.pdf

    A paper of it's origins.....
    http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1053&context=edupapers

    Your HookInToHockey manual would have references to Game Sense also.

    We don't do boring drills much, particularly not with kids who are 11.

    Either way, I don't know how we got down this track, the OP asked for some drills to get started and I thought a couple of warmup drills and a few games would help. Semantics aside I am sure we are all in the same broad church, play a modified game that encourages discovery of particular behaviours, prod players towards asking the right questions of you and themselves, move to more organic game play that allows expression of the behaviours learned. Little differences in the approach to this is why we can all perform differently with different players.
     

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