Coaching Girls Hockey

Discussion in 'Training Tips & Coaching' started by BlindGoalie613, Mar 21, 2016.

  1. BlindGoalie613

    BlindGoalie613 FHF All Time Great

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    Hi all
    About to take the plunge and coach a girls hockey team having only coached boys before.
    Can anyone give me any communication tips to be aware of, game theory or anything about how playing styles will differ?
    Or just general advice.
     
  2. Peakey

    Peakey FHF Regular Player

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    There's really not much difference, I've found. Your coaching will change in response to how you see the individuals play, not just because they're girls. Maybe leave the spitting, cussing and dirty stories for bonding with the boys teams.
     
  3. BlindGoalie613

    BlindGoalie613 FHF All Time Great

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    Still useful advice, thankyou.
     
  4. SPetitt

    SPetitt FHF All Time Great

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    I don't know what the skill-level of the girls is, but I recall being asked to give a one-off coaching session to 2 teams of (almost all) real beginners when I wasn't long out of school myself, but playing at quite a good club level.
    The most obvious thing about such players was, and probably still is, that they all rushed to where the ball was and hacked at it!
    In the short time I had, and completely off the top of my head, I allocated half of them(one team) zones which they were not allowed to leave, and asked them to push, not hit, the ball. (It was a hard, reasonably smooth playing surface) The other half was allowed to do their own thing for a while and then they swopped roles.
    The 2-3 who obviously had played a bit were put in central midfield and reminded that it was a team game and they couldn't do everything!
    The result amazed me ... and their teacher, I think ... the disciplined team completely dominated the others. (And they seemed to enjoy it)

    This is probably a very antiquated idea, but it just might give you an idea ... I hope so. Good luck. :)
     
  5. Vee

    Vee FHF Newbie

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    I suppose as with all new coaches ,the first thing I do is correct and reinforce the basic skills levels its amazing to find that even experienced players develop bad habits or have not being coached in the basic technical skills .
     
  6. CRV

    CRV FHF Top Player

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    Girls in general love to talk through out coaching, especially teenagers, be firm but fair, my coach when I was a junior would invite girls who wouldn't stop chatting when he was talking to sit out at the side and continue their conversation as it had no place in his session, I always found this to be fair and it did solve the problem.

    Girls don't play as fast as guys and don't have the same confidence in trying things out in my experience so giving them time and encouragement to do so is important.


    Player for 15 years, coach for 6.
    Sponsored by Beikou Hockey
     
  7. BlindGoalie613

    BlindGoalie613 FHF All Time Great

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    Thanks, this was pretty close to reality actually. Very interesting thanks.
     
  8. Sven

    Sven FHF Regular Player

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    I've recently started coaching a girls team of mostly beginners myself. It's also my first foray into coaching, so it is a learning experience for everybody. I have been focusing on the most basic, fundamental skills. This gives an brand new players a chance to get used to the stick and the most common movements of it, while also letting me watch the more experienced players and correct bad habits they have developed. For example, SO MANY of them have a habit of hitting either with their hands slightly apart, or with their arms mostly straight, relying solely on their wrists for power. No wonder their hits weren't going anywhere!
     
  9. SPetitt

    SPetitt FHF All Time Great

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    Yes, fundamental skills are just that ....
    However, inn my experience most young people just want to play, so it's important not to spend too much time on drills, and to incorporate as much game into the drills as you can.
     
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  10. sanabas

    sanabas FHF All Time Great

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    Leave that out for all the juniors (and most of the coaching). My brain seems to have an 'I'm coaching' setting that it automatically uses, I almost never swear when working with kids or coaching or both. Every once in a while a word slips out, much to the amusement of 12 year olds if they're in earshot. Do occasionally break it on purpose, because it seems like a good idea. Had one 15 year old girl who was very timid on the field, was in a team where she was maybe a little out of her depth, kept turning hr back if someone wound up to hit. She was playing on the wing, at least 50% of the reason was it was best place to hide her. Message finally started to sink in, she's stood 5m from a 16, actually trapped it, run in and had a shot at goal. When she'd subbed, had 3 15 year olds in dugout, so asked 'do you guys mind if I swear?' 'Nope' '<player>, that was f%^king awesome!'

    I also don't think there's too much difference. There's more difference between individual kids of the same gender than the average boy & average girl, so you adapt to the individual. Some kids respond well to some friendly heckling, some would have it dent their confidence. And so on. But if forced to make a generalisation, I'd agree with @CRV , the boys are more willing to show off, have a bit more self-confidence, while the girls have a bit more self-discipline, more willing to do the team thing. The average ones maybe fall on the opposite sides of that balance between white line fever at one extreme and an unwillingness to back yourself at the other. And of course in the same age group, the boys are generally bigger & stronger, so can hit harder and are better able to do things like throwing overheads.

    And while I'm generalising, I'd say there's less difference between the genders for keepers than for field players, I think the keepers are somewhat self-selected for certain traits.

    Yep. It's important to keep things interesting at any level, but especially for the younger groups. Their attention span is generally shorter, which is an important thing to be aware of.
     
  11. murph

    murph FHF All Time Great

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    Whenever I've coached female keepers I've been pretty much the same as I have with make keepers. Only thing I did do was try my best to avoid too much innuendo!

    Team management and assisting with junior training...as the advice above says the girls are more chatty, nothing wrong with that. ..get chatting to them and then work in the improvement or skillyou're trying to impart. For example...

    "She didn't run to the ball will! " whilst laughing
    "Well, next time, call her name before you pass"

    Another example...lass of 10 wanted to kit up, she found it far more fun to laugh every time she kicked it 5 yards wideof me than anything, I taught her how to be more direct, when it didn't work she still laughed, she had fun and maybe will try again some day. ,,

    And so on....keep it simple keep it fun and you can't go wrong. For different ages, adjust your attitude in line with theirs.
     
    #11 murph, Sep 5, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2016
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  12. Dave Auld

    Dave Auld FHF Starter

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    I have coached U13 & U17 girls teams for a few years now. I really believe, especially with girls, communication is the key. Have a laugh and have a joke, but also, in confidence, be very honest with them. Always remain positive and really try to not single any player out if something was not done correctly. What I've found works best is that you give the girls the skills and then translate it to how they would use it on the field. When what ever it is you had shown them actually works for them on the field, you have then 'sold' the skill / technique to them and they will start using it.

    I always encourage experimentation. I ask them if they think it will work. I let them try. I let them discover, and if I (and the squad) think the idea has merit then we work on that idea at training and try to introduce it into their game.

    Always smile. It's amazing and such a helpful tool - for all occasions when coaching. Girls really feed of it.

    :)
     

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